Pistons, Passions, Pleasures - A Sicilian Dream

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Interview with David Biggins - Producer at Nice International Film Festival where the film received 2 nominations & one Award

Posted 31st May in Production News


Screen Relish Film Review

A SICILIAN DREAM Review

Posted on Oct 28 2015 - 2:52pm by Donna Kelly

A Silican Dream
Director: Philip Walsh

Cast: Alain de Cadenet, Francesco da Mosto, Silvana Paladino

Rating: PG

Running Time: 73 mins

There have been several high-profile attempts to bring the thrill of motorsport to the big screen, GRAND PRIX (1966), LE MANS (1971), SENNA (2010) and RUSH (2013) to name but a few, but few successfully get to the heart of the sport. One film attempting to do just that is A SICILIAN DREAM, a theatrical documentary about the Targa Florio.

A SICILIAN DREAM is a documentary drama film about the rise and fall of the longest-running road race in the world. Dreamt up by Vincenzo Florio, the younger son of a leading Sicilian family, the Targa Florio was an open road car race held in the mountains of Sicily near Palermo. It ran between 1906 and 1977 and was considered one of the most challenging and dangerous endurance races of its time. The race was eventually stopped in 1977 due to safety concerns but inspired an era of motorsport that is still going today.

A SICILIAN DREAM brings together the key elements that made the Targa Florio the event that it was – the man, the race and the island. Presented by racing driver Alain de Cadenet and revered Italian historian Francesco da Mosto, the 73 minute feature explores the legend and intrigue of the event in an attempt to uncover what compelled the drivers to seek the glory of winning this death-defying race. The film sees Francesco and Alain drive the circuit in a series of vintage cars, as they take us through the stories that make up the history of the race.

The film is spilt into two parts. The first half covers the history of the race and its founder Vincenzo Florio. We are introduced to Silvana Paladino, the closest living relative of Vincenzo, who tells us about Vincenzo and his motivations behind the race. The second half of the film concentrates on the danger of the course as Alain de Cadenet revisits the location of the crash that almost killed him forty years ago. In an emotional scene, he meets for the first time the son of the Sicilian farmer who pulled him from the burning wreckage.

What makes A SICILIAN DREAM different to other motorsport documentaries is the way in which it is filmed. The feature is very theatrical in its style with dream-like reconstructions and dramatic recreations of the race. There are some stunning visuals of the mountains and villages of the striking Sicilian countryside, as well as some arty close-up shots of the cars. Even the storyline is a little theatrical in style with the two men embarking on an inner journey, as well as his physical one. For Alain, the journey is about putting the horrors of his crash behind him, for Francesco it is about reconnecting with his Sicilian roots.

There are plenty of juicy anecdotes to keep the motorsport fans entertained, including a funny story about Enzo Ferrari, a baroness and a lift, as well as cameo appearances from such racing legends as Jochen Mass.

While A SICILIAN DREAM is certainly an interesting feature, it is very much a niche film. An early scene of Alain and Francesco poring over the dashboard of a vintage automobile suggests it’s been compiled with a specialist audience in mind. Today, the Rally Targa Florio is a show-case event for lovers of classic and vintage cars and the feature has essentially been made for them. The way the film is cut also suggests it was made for television, rather than the big screen or DVD.

That said, if you’re a fan of vintage cars or endurance racing and have a spare hour to kill, you’re sure to enjoy A SICILIAN DREAM. It doesn’t quite match the splendour, excitement or danger of DUST TO GLORY (2005), GRAND PRIX: THE KILLER YEARS (2010) or SENNA (2010) but it’s certainly worth a watch nevertheless.

Posted 29th Oct in Production News


Nick Mason, Drummer for Pink Floyd comments on the film and his cars at the Premiere

Nick Mason: my love for motorsport was “inevitable”

TV presenter and motor racing champion Alain de Cadenet and Italian architect, writer and presenter Francesco da Mosto have joined forces to create a film based around the about the legendary Sicilian motor race, the Targa Florio.

A Sicilian Dream is a theatrical documentary about the rise and fall of the Florio Dynasty in Sicily, and the Targa Florio – the longest-running road race in the world. It follows the history of the two races, through the memories of personalities who both watched and took part in them.

I spoke with Italian motorsport fan and drummer of Pink Floyd, Nick Mason, about the film and how motorsport has influenced his life. Nick is a close personal friend of Alain and has motor oil running in his families veins.

MD: Are you looking forward to seeing the film?

NM: Yes I am, Alain [de Cadenet] is one of my oldest friends and is partially one of the reasons I ended up doing what I was doing. I think he’s a great presenter and jovial character. And anything to do with motorsport and the great races of yesteryear. I’m fairly certain it will be a jolly evening.

MD: How did you become so passionate about Italian motorsport?

NM: Well, it was all my father’s fault. My father, Bill Mason, made documentary films, initially for Shell, and inevitably a lot of those were to do with motorcars and motor sport and he ended up making films about Le Mans and the Mille Miglia, which he drove and then a whole series of films on the history of motorsport.

He also used to race himself; he had a vintage Bentley. I was sort of brought up in that environment completely. It was sort of inevitable really that I would end up being involved.

MD: Is this film similar to the work your father produced?

NM: It’s different, but I think it’s the kind of thing he might have enjoyed doing now. I mean a lot of what he did was the assembling of old footage. The Mille Miglia film he actually filmed from the passenger seat of a Ferrari in the race. I think he would have absolutely approved of this kind of movie.

MD: I believe that you have spent time racing yourself, haven’t you?

NM: Yes I have, and that’s sort of where I met Alain many many years ago. Well it must have been in the mid 70’s I guess. 25, 35, probably 40 years ago now.

MD: Was Alain the one who got you racing?

NM: Yeah, I suppose. Alain was very helpful to me when I moved on from historic racing to what was then modern racing.When I went to Le Mans, for instance, for the first time. He’s a very supportive guru to have for those sorts of occasions. He’ll talk you round the circuit.

One of the great things about motor racing is the generosity of spirit; competitors who will spend quite a lot of time teaching newcomers the best way around the circuit. I certainly had Alain showing me around Le Man, just in a road car, showing me what to look for.

MD: What is it exactly that you love about racing?

NM: Well, I think it’s probably a combination of things rather than just one thing. There is obviously the adrenaline rush of driving fast cars, of driving near the limit. The limit of the car and the limit of your ability which aren’t always the same.

But I also get a lot of pleasure from the rest of it. I like working on the cars, I like restoring a car that has fallen into disrepair. And the history; I think there is something wonderful about driving some of the old cars, knowing that this was the sort of car that Fagioli drove.

It’s a multi-faceted thing really. It’s the enjoyment of the cars, not just being involved in the actual driving.

MD: Do you have a large collection of your own?

NM: I like to think it’s a modest collection, but other people seem to think that 40 cars is slightly bigger than modest. I’ve had lots of fun with all the cars over the years.

I never set out to collect them, or end up with as many cars. I’ve got the cars that I drove at Le Mans in 79 and 1980. I’ve got cars that I rebuilt in the 70’s and have raced ever since. It’s not that one wants to collect all these things, otherwise it’s a bit like selling your children.

MD: Do you have a favorite car?

NM: I would say I’ve sort of got three favorites rather than just one. A pre-war Aston Martin, because it is the first car I ever raced. I’ve still got it, I still race it and my kids race it and my wife races it and it’s been around for a long time.

A Birdcage Maserati, because I still think it’s one of the best racing cars ever made since 1959. It’s so balanced and it looks great and it drives wonderfully and it punches above its weight. It was successful in its heyday and is still successful today against much bigger cars.

Then finally, the Ferrari 250 GTO, because it makes me look so clever to have bought it two years ago.

MD: Have you been to where the film is set, in Sicily?

NM: No I haven’t but it’s one of those things that I want to do one day. They do have a sort of retro race there now, so it’s on the list of things that would still be fun to do.

A Sicilian Dream will be in cinemas 23 October and is set to be released on DVD 9 November. Visit: siciliandreammovie.com for more information.

Posted 29th Oct in Production News


Nick Mason commenting on his love for Motor Sport

Nick Mason: my love for motorsport was “inevitable”

TV presenter and motor racing champion Alain de Cadenet and Italian architect, writer and presenter Francesco da Mosto have joined forces to create a film based around the about the legendary Sicilian motor race, the Targa Florio.

A Sicilian Dream is a theatrical documentary about the rise and fall of the Florio Dynasty in Sicily, and the Targa Florio – the longest-running road race in the world. It follows the history of the two races, through the memories of personalities who both watched and took part in them.

I spoke with Italian motorsport fan and drummer of Pink Floyd, Nick Mason, about the film and how motorsport has influenced his life. Nick is a close personal friend of Alain and has motor oil running in his families veins.

MD: Are you looking forward to seeing the film?

NM: Yes I am, Alain [de Cadenet] is one of my oldest friends and is partially one of the reasons I ended up doing what I was doing. I think he’s a great presenter and jovial character. And anything to do with motorsport and the great races of yesteryear. I’m fairly certain it will be a jolly evening.

MD: How did you become so passionate about Italian motorsport?

NM: Well, it was all my father’s fault. My father, Bill Mason, made documentary films, initially for Shell, and inevitably a lot of those were to do with motorcars and motor sport and he ended up making films about Le Mans and the Mille Miglia, which he drove and then a whole series of films on the history of motorsport.

He also used to race himself; he had a vintage Bentley. I was sort of brought up in that environment completely. It was sort of inevitable really that I would end up being involved.

MD: Is this film similar to the work your father produced?

NM: It’s different, but I think it’s the kind of thing he might have enjoyed doing now. I mean a lot of what he did was the assembling of old footage. The Mille Miglia film he actually filmed from the passenger seat of a Ferrari in the race. I think he would have absolutely approved of this kind of movie.

MD: I believe that you have spent time racing yourself, haven’t you?

NM: Yes I have, and that’s sort of where I met Alain many many years ago. Well it must have been in the mid 70’s I guess. 25, 35, probably 40 years ago now.

MD: Was Alain the one who got you racing?

NM: Yeah, I suppose. Alain was very helpful to me when I moved on from historic racing to what was then modern racing.When I went to Le Mans, for instance, for the first time. He’s a very supportive guru to have for those sorts of occasions. He’ll talk you round the circuit.

One of the great things about motor racing is the generosity of spirit; competitors who will spend quite a lot of time teaching newcomers the best way around the circuit. I certainly had Alain showing me around Le Man, just in a road car, showing me what to look for.

MD: What is it exactly that you love about racing?

NM: Well, I think it’s probably a combination of things rather than just one thing. There is obviously the adrenaline rush of driving fast cars, of driving near the limit. The limit of the car and the limit of your ability which aren’t always the same.

But I also get a lot of pleasure from the rest of it. I like working on the cars, I like restoring a car that has fallen into disrepair. And the history; I think there is something wonderful about driving some of the old cars, knowing that this was the sort of car that Fagioli drove.

It’s a multi-faceted thing really. It’s the enjoyment of the cars, not just being involved in the actual driving.

MD: Do you have a large collection of your own?

NM: I like to think it’s a modest collection, but other people seem to think that 40 cars is slightly bigger than modest. I’ve had lots of fun with all the cars over the years.

I never set out to collect them, or end up with as many cars. I’ve got the cars that I drove at Le Mans in 79 and 1980. I’ve got cars that I rebuilt in the 70’s and have raced ever since. It’s not that one wants to collect all these things, otherwise it’s a bit like selling your children.

MD: Do you have a favorite car?

NM: I would say I’ve sort of got three favorites rather than just one. A pre-war Aston Martin, because it is the first car I ever raced. I’ve still got it, I still race it and my kids race it and my wife races it and it’s been around for a long time.

A Birdcage Maserati, because I still think it’s one of the best racing cars ever made since 1959. It’s so balanced and it looks great and it drives wonderfully and it punches above its weight. It was successful in its heyday and is still successful today against much bigger cars.

Then finally, the Ferrari 250 GTO, because it makes me look so clever to have bought it two years ago.

MD: Have you been to where the film is set, in Sicily?

NM: No I haven’t but it’s one of those things that I want to do one day. They do have a sort of retro race there now, so it’s on the list of things that would still be fun to do.

A Sicilian Dream will be in cinemas 23 October and is set to be released on DVD 9 November. Visit: siciliandreammovie.com for more information.

Posted 29th Oct in Production News


PRESS REVIEWS

Interview: NICK MASON by Matt Dawson

image

(Photo credit - Cristina Massei)

Prior to the premiere of A Sicilian Dream - a documentary that encapsulates the history of the Targa Florio which ran until 1977 - we caught up with Nick Mason (Pink Floyd, Ten Tenths) whose father was known for making documentaries about motor sport and motor racing.

In this preview of the interview (the full chat will be in our upcoming issue) we discuss his father’s work plus Nick’s own passion for motor sports and the history behind it.

What was it that got you interested into motor sports/motor cars specifically? I know your father made some documentaries.

Basically it was my father that got me into it, he was a filmmaker – he did documentaries for Shell primarily about motoring , motor sport and mechanical things, he made a film on the Mille Miglia, on Le Mans and eventually a five part series on the history of motor racing but he also used to race himself so for me as a kid the big treat was to be taken to Silverstone when he was racing.

I believe you have a 1930 Bentley that he used to race at Silverstone.

That’s right. We’ve had it in the family for nearly seventy years.

It was also due to Enzo [Ferrari]’s invitation your father took part in the Mille Miglia.

Absolutely, he had actually gone there to film it but he came up with driving the car and it was Enzo that facilitated that, it wouldn’t have been possible without Enzo sort of making it happen.

I presume then you and your father knew of the legacy of the Targa while growing up – I suppose a similar feel would also come in the case of Le Mans in France where you’ve been a few times with the Ten Tenths team.

I did the real race in the eighties then I did the historic race sort of recently but Le Mans slightly different because it’s still an active event whereas I think the Targa there’s this sort of nostalgia that applies to some of the great races that no longer exist: the Nurburgring thousand kilometre race, the Carrera Panamericana, that sort of thing. It’s sort of keeping history alive I suppose.

Would you say those are your favourite races historically?

For me my favourite races are long distance sports car races full stop, Le Mans was always the ultimate goal of where I wanted to get to but the cars I tend to like particularly tend to be those sort of cars and the events that go with them, the heritage of the events.

What was the first car you had?

My first car was an Austin 7 Chummy 1927, cost twenty quid and it was very much what my father thought should be part of my education which was something very simple that could be fettled at home, that’s where I learnt the basics of looking after a car, I mean the funny thing is now that no longer exists really because virtually every car now arrives now with a plate over the engine saying if you touch this you will die and you will invalidate your guarantee so those days are over more or less of actual tinkering but that was very much my sort of introduction to cars and eventually to more sporting cars, the Chummy gave way to the [Austin Seven] Nippy then a pre war Aston Martin.

Posted 29th Oct in Production News


The Old Motor Review of A Sicilian Dream

http://theoldmotor.com/?p=150971

AN ENTERTAINING & INFORMATIVE VINTAGE AUTOMOBILE INTERNET MAGAZINE

pistons passions and pleasures h

The Long Awaited Movie: Pistons, Passions, Pleasures – A Sicilian Dream Premiers

We last reported in May that the film Pistons, Passions, Pleasures – A Sicilian Dream had finished the production phase after over 3-years of work and filming on the island of Sicily. And now 4-years later, the production, a brilliant piece of film-making is finished. The London premiere was held on the evening of October 19th to a sold-out crowd at the Prince Charles Theatre located in Leicester Square in the fashionable West End of London.

A number of vintage racing and old car enthusiasts including Guest Celebrity vintage racer Nick Mason of Pink Floyd attended. Also attending as presenters at the preview were Alain de Cadenet, who competed in eight 24 Hours of Le Mans races, US-based Italian car consultant and correspondent Antonio Lombardi, and Francesco da Mosto a Star of six successful BBC TV series about Italy. All three assisted with the production of the film.

  • The lead image shows Patrick Allen the Mechanic of the 1911 Scat in the film.

uuuuuuuuuuuuuude4x

The festivities at the premiere were covered by “London Live” in this video. The film could not have been made without the tireless efforts of Producer – Promoter David Biggins, a life-long old car and vintage racing enthusiast, who was assisted by Writer-Director Philip Walsh and Assistant Producers Sheila Hayman and Simon Maggi.

View the movie trailer and the first three-minutes of the film (below) at the end of the post.

pistons, passions, pleasures 1

  • Fabrizio Pace as Vincenzo Florio.

The Sicilian Dream Movie describes the race on the picturesque island:

“The Targa Florio was a Sicilian mountain road race that, in 1906, gave birth to an era of motorsport still going today. Dreamt up by Vincenzo Florio, the younger son of a Sicilian entrepreneurial dynasty, it ran until 1977 and was considered both totally insane and an absolute must by drivers and manufacturers alike.”

“A Sicilian Dream is a film that journeys into the heart of this story – exploring the intrigue and revelations. We are taken on this journey by one of Italy’s pre-eminent dreamers – Francesco da Mosto, a Venetian architect, historian and incurable romantic. He invites Alain de Cadenet – an independent racing car constructor and driver to join him and discover what compels men and women to seek the glory of winning this death-defying race.”

“Forty years after nearly dying in the Targa Florio, Alain de Cadenet retraces the route of the legendary Sicilian mountain race that ignited the island and the motoring world. Driving the torturous route and tracing its evolution along with world events, they reveal its allure from the romantic times of the Belle Époque adventures to its deadly conclusion.”

The first Targa Florio was a road race organized by Italian enthusiast Vincenzo Florio in 1906 that took place on the beautiful island of Sicily. You can learn more about the earlier years of the race in our coverage of the book, The Belle Epoque of The Targa Florio Races.

Be sure to view the sensational 2:42 trailer for the film (above) and the first three minutes (below) of the film. Much more can be learned about the production at A Sicilian Dream were you can also contact them about a having it shown at your local theater. A 70-minute long DVD is available from Duke Video a DVD producer that specializes in motorsports that is located on the Isle of Man. It may be available from Duke USA in the future.

  • Bill Sykes (below) driving his 1906 Fiat.

pistons, passions, pleasures 2

This entry was posted in Auto photos 1885 - 1920, video and tagged , , , , , .

Posted 22nd Oct in Production News


London Evening Standard Interview with Alain de Cadenet

London Evening Standard:
Playboys who roar through Knightsbridge in supercars should instead pit themselves against young British racers on the track, according to one of Britain’s top endurance drivers.
Alain de Cadenet criticised the “vulgar exhibitionism” of the summer season that sees millionaires from the Arab states shipping in their ultra high-spec cars to cruise west London.
Mr de Cadenet, father of television presenter Amanda, has competed in eight 24 Hours of Le Mans races.
He described the annual supercar influx as “a vulgar activity given to people who ought to be spending their money going vintage motor racing instead”.
Mr de Cadenet, 69, said: “Better still, they should try and do Formula Ford with all the kamikaze 18-year-olds, who are good. These guys with the big bucks for Lamborghinis, if they fancy themselves as Jack the Lad racers, go and compete with our home-grown Formula Ford racers.
“If you can keep up with them, let alone beat them, you’re good. They would get self-worth, realise they are quite good drivers and they’d also realise it is a civilised thing to be doing, rather than vulgar exhibitionism.” Formula Ford is an entry-level open cockpit racing class in which cars can hit 158mph.
Mr de Cadenet spoke to promote his new theatrical documentary, a Sicilian Dream, about the dynasty behind what was once the world’s longest open road race, the treacherous Targa Florio in Sicily. He described it the “most romantic of all the great road races”.
A Sicilian Dream premieres at the Prince Charles Cinema in Leicester Square on October 19 and is on general release from October

Posted 21st Oct in Production News


Review of A Sicilian Dream by Road Magazine

The Road Magazine:
This is the most instantly
captivating film I have seen for
years.
It’s not about bikes but anyone
with an empathy for wheels,
engines, excess, spirit, danger
and eccentricity will love it.
It is about The Targa Florio, a
Sicilian mountain road race that,
in 1906, gave birth to an era of
motorsport.
It opens with the honeyed
tones of a commentator whose
heavily accented, gravelly but
faultless English describes the
tale of the race from its inception
until its termination in 1977 when
safety concerns deemed it too
insane to continue.
The dusty mountain roads of
Sicily form the track that is
marshalled with a cavalier
indifference to sanity which is
irresponsibly refreshing against
the contrast of today’s health
and safety culture.
I’ve only seen an online
preview as I couldn’t make the
London premier to which I was
invited. Even on the small screen
of my Applemac I was
transported to another world of
warm Mediterranean motorised
bohemia. I guess it’s what you’d
call an art house film.
Emphatically European rather
than American, emphatically
Mediterranean in fact.
The drivers are elite privileged
gladiators in a coliseum of poor
but enthusiastic peasant
onlookers and their bewildered
donkeys.
Sun creased leathery faces
articulate comments on the
lunatics who risked all for glory
in the tradition of Jules Verne.
Rear facing cloth caps. leather
lined brass goggles, tuxedos
and plus fours, brogues, bow
ties and starting handles; open
cars with running boards, great
brass lamps and not a roll bar or
seat belt in sight.
Ideally you should see this film
with a ROSPA directors in order
to watch them squirm with horror
at the mad kaleidoscope of
inappropriate indulgence. Above
all this it is a most beautifully
made film I can remember
seeing for years. Wine, olives
and desperate escapades, ace.

Posted 21st Oct in Production News


London Live TV interview with Francesco da Mosto, Alain de Cadenet & Nick Mason of Pink Floyd and Ten Tenths Racing.

A SICILIAN DREAM - London Live TV interview at the Premiere from David Biggins on Vimeo.

Posted 21st Oct in Production News


Colour Upgrade

The trailer displayed in 2015 (not 2013) was very much work in progress and had errors in the colour balance. It has now been upgraded to full vibrant brilliance and resolution. It will be reposted shortly and meanwhile the 2013 trailer is online to show you the quality of video we expected and unfortunately did not get.

Watch this space for further news when it is available for you to view.


Posted 25th Jul in Production News


Gillian Carr: A note

Fabulous news this Friday! Pistons - Passions - Pleasures, A Sicilian Dream is complete! Congratulations to Dave Biggins who has dedicated over 4 years to the project. I just cannot wait to see the finished product and relive memories of our time filming in Sicily with the Edwardian cars last September. It was without a shadow of a doubt, one of the best experiences of my life.

Gillian Carr Secretary of the Grand Prix Drivers Association.

Posted 6th Mar in Production News





Meanwhile if you register your interest with an email address and location/post code, we can determine where our audiences are for screenings later this year.

Please pass on the link and get as many followers in your nearest town to sign up and so ensure it will come as soon as possible.

 

David White

2 April at 09:40

 

just preparing my Oscar acceptance speech for best supporting actor

........................................................................................

Katy Hunter-Choat shared a post.

13 hrs ·

This is a wonderful film made by some wonderful people about the Targa Floria, an exciting classic car race around Sicily.

Antonio Lombardi

A motoring media and trade consultant and correspondent from the USA for the Italian vintage car magazine EpocAuto, Antonio cajoled me, sweet talked me into this project.

Without him we would not have made it happen. Antonio is saturated in the Targa Florio , knows just about everyone on the island connected with the Florio races, many of the later winners and is an encyclopedia of knowledge. He contacts people and makes things happen; he is Director of Upfolds Media since its inception. In the picture, Antonio with Alain De Cadenet and Francesco Da Mosto while filming in Cefalu'

David Biggins - Producer

Carolyn Saunders = Scriptwriter

This is fantastic, and it looks beautiful. I can't wait to see the whole film.  I'm really happy to have worked on this. Writing it was great fun, learning about the race was amazing, and everyone involved in this production, from David on down, was first-class. Just a really great experience, that I appreciate very much, and I'm glad for all of us that this looks so good.

With out forgetting  everyone else who helped make this project a reality, It has been one of the most amazing experiences of my life and a piece of work I am truly proud to have been involved with!
Matt Lawson - Assistant Director

Comments from The Old Motor

Thank you David Greenlees

  1. We are *so* looking forward to seeing that film.

    Thanks for keeping us updated.
    Tom M.

  2. Can’t wait! Thanks!

  3. Wow! The most fun I ever had in my life was driving antique racing cars in racing reenactments about 40 years ago. Watching that short trailer brought tears to my eyes.

    • WAYNE SHELDON ·April 8, 2015 at 3:15 am

      I am sorry, I just had to watch that trailer again!

      Yes David G, do keep us poor little folks informed about future availability of the full movie.

  4. looks like a great movie!

  5. Boy… it tempts me to take a brass car to Sicily. I could look up my dad’s family (if anyone is left). I think some of those little kids are my uncles! They were about that age at the time, and they were in Sicily visiting their grandparents. Its too bad everyone is gone now, I’d have asked them if they saw the race.

    • Joe, It certainly is a beautiful island. Dave Biggins and a number of ours involved w/the movie can’t say enough nice things about it. What a great place it would be to stage a car tour.

  6. GEORGE KAMINSKI ·April 12, 2015 at 11:50 am

    You are absolutely correct, David, about how beautiful Sicily is. I was there last year and took up Italian language when I got back. In fact, I can’t wait to go back and discover more of its beauty. This movie trailer is the perfect way to experience it and these magnificent automobiles. Please keep us posted as to when it might be shown in the U.S. I have a group of people already waiting to see it.

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Russo Francesco Giovanni Merita un premio. Come miglior film - documentario anno 2015. Sono convinto che a presto approderà in America e le sale cinematografiche saranno stracolme di italo-americani e sportivi di qualità.

He deserves an award. As the best documentary film-Year 2015. I am convinced that to soon will dock in America and the cinemas will be packed with Italo-American Sports and quality.

A Sicilian Dream selected for Best Documentary - Feature at the upcoming Indy Fest at Indianapolis July 16th 2016


FORBESLIFE279 views

Pistons, Passions, Pleasures: Upcoming Film About The Targa Florio

Pistons, Passions, Pleasures: A Sicilian Dream is a dramatized documentary about the early life of Vincenzo Florio and the establishment of the Targa Florio road race. The film includes interviews of racers who participated, and local Sicilians who experienced the Targa running through their villages and across the narrow roads of the region. The film’s trailer is at the bottom of this post.

Above: Alain de Cadenet in an Alfa Romeo.

Above: Alain de Cadenet in an Alfa Romeo.

Vincenzo Florio was scion of Sicily’s leading family and heir to a wine and spice business, but his passion was auto racing, and the future. In 1906 at the age of 23 he established the Targa Florio, a race that ran over open roads in Sicily. The race was a fine expression of the culture before World War One, a period of invention and the zenith of Europe’s power in the world.

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